Wood Stork: EVERGLADES

The Wood Stork (Mycteria americana) is an “indicator species” of the Everglades, and it tells us much about the health of the imperiled ecosystem. The breeding success of the species depends on the region’s complex water cycles and their effect on food availability. If storks fail to breed any one year, it is likely due to poor management of our wetlands, which have been diked and controlled for several decades. Stork diet includes many species of small fish, crabs, crayfish, snakes, frogs, young alligators, rodents, and occasionally the young of other bird species. Wood Storks typically wade with their open bills in shallow water, snapping them shut very quickly at the slightest touch of food matter.

Detail of "Wood Storks at Paurotis Pond." This watercolor is being done on site, while observing the birds through Leica APO-Televid 65 and 77 scopes.
Detail of “Wood Storks at Paurotis Pond.” This watercolor is being done on site, while observing the birds through Leica APO-Televid 65 and 77 scopes.

Below are various works in progress featuring Wood Storks, done at the Everglades during breeding season.
CLICK ON AN IMAGE TO ACTIVATE THE CAROUSEL.

Detail of "Wood Storks at Paurotis Pond." This watercolor is being done on site, while observing the birds through Leica APO-Televid 65 and 77 scopes.
Detail of “Wood Storks at Paurotis Pond.” This watercolor is being done on site, while observing the birds through Leica APO-Televid 65 and 77 scopes.

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